The Slant http://slant.investorplace.com Turning headlines into real investing ideas Wed, 28 May 2014 18:14:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 These CEOs Don’t Care What Investors Think http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/ceos-dont-care-investors-think/ http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/ceos-dont-care-investors-think/#comments Wed, 28 May 2014 13:55:12 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?post_type=slant-video&p=15332 Facebook, Amazon and Tesla execs have a vision that they strongly believe in. That's great if it pans out, but if it doesn't, shareholders WILL feel the pain because these CEOs do their own thing regardless of outside criticism.

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Investors frequently look to big-name CEOs to protect their interests and deliver big returns through successful leadership. But what happens when a rock-star executive has so much power that he ends up caring more about his personal vision than the shareholders of his company’s stock?

That’s what investors have in front of them with the likes of Elon Musk at Tesla (TSLA), Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook (FB) and Jeff Bezos of Amazon (AMZN).

Consider TSLA exec Elon Musk, who in October 2013 said, “The stock price that we have is more than we have any right to deserve.” And that was when Tesla was at, like, $170 or so. Traders should wonder what he thinks now that the stock is above $200.

Or consider Zuckerberg at Facebook, who controls more than half of outstanding voting rights in FB stock — meaning even if every other shareholder disagreed with one of his moves, Zuck could simply do it anyway.

Then there is Bezos at AMZN, who has made a career out of deferring profits simply for the sake of revenue growth.

Now, these visionary CEOs are smarter that I will ever be and of course deserve credit for getting to where they are. But investors need to understand the risks involved with backing this kind of leader, because there is little chance that they will listen to outside perspectives and change course simply to protect shareholder value.

For more detail, check out my article on MarketWatch about 5 CEOs who don’t care what you think.

Or check out the accompanying video from my recent appearance on Fox Business Network.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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The Dollar Is Dying http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/dollar-dying/ http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/dollar-dying/#comments Tue, 27 May 2014 15:57:18 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?p=15321 More and more Americans are going cashless, and 3 in 4 likely would not have a dollar in their pocket if you asked them.

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A recent survey by VoucherCloud shows over half of Americans don’t carry cash anymore.

Count me as one of them.

According to the result, 57% of the 2,341 Americans surveyed “never” carry cash, using credit or debit cards. Part of that is convenience, but a big part of that is also safety. An additional 16% said they “rarely” carry cash, meaning almost 3 of 4 people on the street wouldn’t have a spare dollar or two on them if you asked.

The reasons, according to VoucherCloud, are as follows

  1. Concerns over safety and the risk of theft: 65% marked this reason on the survey
  2. I am worried about the risk of losing my wallet and/or its contents: 53%
  3. It’s more convenient to use cards rather than cash: 44%
  4. I often intend to carry cash and then forget to withdraw any: 39%
  5. Concerns about hygiene and germs carried on cash: 23%
  6. I don’t have access to cash: 14%

This trend has obvious upside for payment processors like Visa (V) and MasterCard (MA), which make money on every swipe of card with their logo, or for eBay (EBAY) with its PayPal mobile payments division.

But there’s also a downside, warns Matthew Wood of VoucherCloud:

“While using payment cards rather than cash is a widespread modern phenomenon, because it is so quick and convenient, it can become a dangerous trend for some of us! It’s much harder to keep up with what you’re spending as you don’t see the money leave your hands and, because it’s just a little piece of plastic, it doesn’t feel like a real exchange. It’s easy to get carried away.”

Countless research indicates you spend more when swiping a card instead of using cash, because the lost money isn’t as tangible … but in an increasingly digital age, it seems unlikely this decline of the paper dollar will abate anytime soon.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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SPLS – The Crazy Case for Buying Staples Stock Now http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/spls-crazy-case-buying-staples-stock-now/ http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/spls-crazy-case-buying-staples-stock-now/#comments Tue, 27 May 2014 10:31:06 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?p=15308 It's a bit of a crazy idea, but a big dividend and overly negative sentiment could signal a bargain in Staples stock.

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Staples (SPLS) is not exactly a hot commodity among investors. SPLS stock has crashed 27% year-to-date in 2014, and is off 50% since 2010.

staples logo spls stockIt’s not hard to understand why. For starters, revenue has been struggling with FY2014 sales down about 5% over FY2013 numbers. Also, the merger between Office Depot (ODP) and OfficeMax allowed the Nos. 2 and 3 office supply retailers to join forces and hopefully compete better with Staples stock going forward.

Oh yeah, and SPLS just announced plans to close another 225 underperforming stores…. that too.

But despite the stagnant top line, the tough competition from ODP and the even tougher competition from online merchants like Amazon (AMZN), there are a few arguments that can be made for buying Staples stock right now.

They might be slightly crazy, but they are pretty legitimate reasons when you stop and think about them. Here they are:

E-commerce: SPLS has a decent online sales engine; Staples.com is the No. 2 e-commerce player in the U.S., according to Internet Retailer data. Nearly half of the company’s sales are generated online — so while stores are closing, that might not mean all that much of a sales hit if SPLS pivots correctly.

Dividend: Unlike other troubled retailers, Staples is actually quite profitable. And while those profits don’t burn down the house, they are big enough to support a hefty 4.1% dividend yield. Furthermore, that dividend of 48 cents per share annually is up about 118% from 22 cents per share annually back in 2006, just eight short years ago. The icing on the cake is that the dividend is 48% of earnings right now, meaning it is sustainable and still ripe for possible increases.

How Much Worse Can It Get? Staples has been battered by negative sentiment around weak business spending, weak retail results, the pressure of e-commerce and a host of other factors. The company now has a forward P/E of less than 12 but a stable business even if it’s not growing and a juicy dividend. The sellers seem to have already sold … so why not take a flier on this unloved stock?

It’s a bit of a crazy argument, I know, since plenty of stocks like SPLS have left investors in tears; a bargain buy for the dividend only works if shares don’t fall apart.

But if you’re looking around this battered market for values, I think Staples could be one.

I mean, you could do much worse.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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Why a Correction is Coming … And Why That’s a GOOD Thing http://slant.investorplace.com/podcast/2014/05/correction-coming-thats-good-thing/ http://slant.investorplace.com/podcast/2014/05/correction-coming-thats-good-thing/#comments Sun, 25 May 2014 13:04:23 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?post_type=slant-podcast&p=15300 Wall Street could get rocky in the months ahead... but don't worry about it, because that will present opportunity. Richard Band, the editor of Profitable Investing, recommends buying ConAgra, JP Morgan and Toyota on a 5% to 7% pullback this summer. Here's why:

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With the stock market once again pushing up against all-time highs, many investors are wondering whether the other shoe is bound to drop. After all, we saw a 30% up year in 2013 for the S&P 500, and that can’t last forever … and while we’ve regained some of the momentum since the market got rocky earlier this year, select sectors including Internet stocks and biotechnology companies remain under pressure big-time.

So what’s an investor to do?

I talked with Richard Band, the editor of Profitable Investing, about the current state of things. And while he thinks there is indeed a correction coming this summer, it won’t be a crash that results in long-term pain.

That means now is the time to consider slipping into defensive dividend payers, and keeping your powder dry for some more cyclical investments on a pullback.

Two such picks Richard likes are ConAgra (CAG), a packaged foods giant that will be stable in any market, and financial giant JPMorgan Chase (JPM).

ConAgra is one of those solid picks for any market, and Richard likes CAG under $31. JPM is a bit more susceptible to market trends, so he only advises a buy under $52 – but if we see a 5% to 10% pullback, the financial stock would easily be under that level.

Check out the accompanying audio for more details, or read more about Richard’s strategy and picks over at Profitable Investing.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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TGT – 3 Big Reasons Target Stock Is a Buy Now http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/tgt-3-big-reasons-target-stock-buy-now/ http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/tgt-3-big-reasons-target-stock-buy-now/#comments Sat, 24 May 2014 14:29:40 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?post_type=slant-video&p=15286 Target (TGT) has been battered by billion-dollar losses in its Canada unit and the fallout from recent security issues. But don't give up on TGT stock just yet. Charles Sizemore tells us why.

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Target (TGT) has been battered by billion-dollar losses in its Canada unit, and the fallout from recent security issues and the loss of customer data.

But Charles Sizemore, editor of Macro Trend Investor, says you shouldn’t give up on TGT stock just yet. Here’s why:

  • Target has been beaten down and nobody likes it, meaning there could be value.
  • TGT stock is one of the most shareholder friendly investments out there, raising dividends since 1967 and repurchasing 44% of outstanding Target shares since 2002.
  • Target has plenty of room to keep ramping up its dividend going forward, and could benefit from a broader economy recovery that boosts consumer spending in the years ahead.

Read Charles’ recent article about why Target is a dividend darling, or check out the accompanying video for more information on why Target stock could be a good bet for long-term investors.

Also, sign up for Charles Sizemore’s FREE weekly e-letter covering top market insights, trends, and the best stocks and ETFs to profit from today’s best global value plays.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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3 Must-Watch Macro Trends – And 3 Sure Ways to Profit http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/3-must-watch-macro-trends-3-sure-ways-profit/ http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/3-must-watch-macro-trends-3-sure-ways-profit/#comments Fri, 23 May 2014 14:27:08 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?post_type=slant-video&p=15285 In a volatile stock market, investors need to seek out certainty where they can... and that's what Charles Sizemore does with his Macro Trend Investor advisory service. See which three powerful megatrends he's watching right now -- and most importantly, what trades you can make to profit from them.

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In a volatile stock market, investors need to seek out certainty where they can … and that’s what Charles Sizemore does with his Macro Trend Investor advisory service.

Three powerful megatrends he’s watching right now are:

  • The demographic shift in America as baby boomers age
  • The persistence of low interest rates in a post-crisis world
  • The rise of Turkey as Europe’s closest emerging market and a gateway to Asia

More important than just these trends, of course, are the trades you can make to profit from these macro investing strategies. So, here’s a look at some investments that Charles Sizemore is recommending to subscribers of his Macro Trend Investor newsletter:

  • DaVita Healthcare Partners (DVA), a kidney dialysis company that has outperformed in 2014. The business has reliable revenue from patients with chronic kidney disease, and demographics will create more “customers” in the years ahead.
  • Mortgage real estate investment trusts, or mREITs, that have been battered in the last 12 months but should perform well as interest rates stabilize — and as investors hunger for yield.
  • iShares MSCI Turkey ETF (TUR), a diversified investment that holds some of the biggest consumer and business plays in Turkey to benefit from the region’s growth.

Check out the accompanying video for more information about these durable, long-term investing trends and how you can profit from them.

Or better yet, sign up for Charles Sizemore’s FREE weekly e-letter covering top market insights, trends, and the best stocks and ETFs to profit from today’s best global value plays.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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MSFT – Microsoft Stock Is a Buy, But Not Thanks to Surface Pro 3 http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/msft-microsoft-stock-buy-thanks-surface-pro-3/ http://slant.investorplace.com/video/2014/05/msft-microsoft-stock-buy-thanks-surface-pro-3/#comments Thu, 22 May 2014 14:14:41 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?post_type=slant-video&p=15287 Microsoft just unveiled its new Surface Pro 3 tablet to much fanfare. But while Charles Sizemore thinks the gadget is great, he thinks the bigger upside to MSFT stock in the months and years ahead will actually come from conventional PC and laptop sales.

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Microsoft (MSFT) has gotten a bad rap in recent years as a dead-money stock that hasn’t budged in a decade, and as a tech also-ran that missed mobile.

However, MSFT stock has been slowly marching higher, pushing up against 14-year highs lately.

So what gives? And more importantly, is Microsoft stock worth a look?

I think it is. As I have written recently here and here, there is a lot to like about MSFT stock, including:

  • $28.8 billion in operating cash flow last year, and about $108 billion in cash and investments on the books.
  • Microsoft’s dividend yield is 2.8%, and its current quarterly payout of 28 cents per share is 250% better from the 8 cents it doled out when distributions began in 2004.
  • A payout ratio for dividends that is just 39% of fiscal 2015 earnings, meaning further increases are likely.
  • $40 billion to stock buybacks on top of those dividends, approved in late 2013
  • And believe it or not, revenue has grown year-over-year in five of the past six earnings reports.

Charles Sizemore is also a bull on MSFT stock — but for a different reason. He likes the prospects of a PC upgrade cycle as tablet growth flat-lines and as “right-sized” laptop-related businesses including Microsoft and Intel (INTC) capitalize on modest growth or at least declines that are less bad than predicted.

After all, Microsoft will never be Apple (AAPL) … so if you’re buying with the hopes of that, you’re missing the point.

Check out the attached video for more details. And if you like what you see, sign up for Charles Sizemore’s FREE weekly e-letter covering top market insights, trends and the best stocks and ETFs to profit from today’s best global value plays.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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Will Molycorp (MCP) and Rare Earth Stocks Ever Make a Comeback? http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/will-molycorp-mcp-rare-earth-stocks-ever-make-comeback/ http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/will-molycorp-mcp-rare-earth-stocks-ever-make-comeback/#comments Wed, 21 May 2014 16:41:18 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?p=15269 For those of you who have forgotten about Molycorp and rare earths, don't worry about brushing up on the topic of REE investments. They're still dead money. And for those of you who happen to be unfortunate shareholders of MCP stock ... well, your desire to forget about rare earth elements is understandable.

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Remember rare earth elements (REE)? Remember Molycorp (MCP), that poster child for rare earth stocks that soared from under $13 in 2010 to a high of about $75 in 2011?

Remember all the talk about how rare earth elements like lanthanides, scandium and yttrium were crucial to high-tech devices, and how export quotas from China could disrupt the global REE market?

If you don’t remember any of this, it might because you’re trying ever so hard to forget about rare earth stocks like Molycorp, Avalon Rare Metals (AVL), Lynas Corporation (LYSDY) or Rare Element Resources Ltd. (REE).

That’s because none of them have lived up to the narrative, and are down by as much as 95% from their 2011 highs.

mcp stock 2011 molycorp
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Take a look at this chart of Molycorp, the largest and most popular of the rare earth stocks … $75 to under $3 per share is quite a beating for MCP stock holders to have endured.

The reason for the meltdown? Well, all the hysterics about rare earth elements being hoarded — and incredibly rare — turned out to be just tall tales.

A lot of rare earth stocks were significantly unprofitable even as their shares soared, and investors started to serious doubt the valuation story. Then, China didn’t tighten the screws on exports as some doomsday headlines predicted. And to top it all off, in 2013, Japan made a massive rare earths find that eased any fears of a supply shortage.

When you have bad balance sheets, increasing supplies that drive down REE costs and a big negative swing in sentiment, you get meltdowns like the one illustrated here in MCP stock.

So has the outlook changed, and is Molycorp or any other rare earth stock a bargain?

mcp stock ytd molycorp
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Not really. The year-to-date chart for MCP stock seems to illustrate plenty of negativity in the near term; the stock has shed 50% in 2014 alone. The company recently melted down on cash flow concerns, and Morgan Stanley downgraded Molycorp with a $2.50 target — below even its current ground-floor price levels.

For those of you who have forgotten about Molycorp and rare earths, don’t worry about brushing up on the topic of REE investments. They’re still dead money.

And for those of you who happen to be unfortunate shareholders of MCP stock … well, your desire to forget about rare earth elements is understandable.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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What Twitch.tv Could Do for Google Stock http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/youtube-buy-twitch-mean-google-stock/ http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/youtube-buy-twitch-mean-google-stock/#comments Mon, 19 May 2014 13:11:38 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?p=15251 Video game sales totaled more than $15 billion in 2013. That's significantly higher than domestic box office sales just shy of $11 billion for the movie biz. That shows Twitch.tv is not just a game for Google, and could be a real revenue driver.

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Google (GOOG, GOOGL) and its YouTube arm are reportedly close to a $1 billion deal to purchase Twitch.tv, a video game streaming service. This comes despite stiff competition from Microsoft (MSFT) and its Xbox unit to purchase Twitch, too.

YouTube to Buy Twitch? What It Would Mean for Google StockFor those unfamiliar, Twitch allows people playing popular video games like Diablo or Minecraft to broadcast their gameplay so others can watch. Users hook up their gaming console or computer to the website and stream games both old and new.

Disclaimer: I admit to watching some Mario on there once a family member tipped me off to the site a few months ago.

msft microsoft stock twitch.tvIf you’re not a gamer, you might be scratching your head right now. That’s because to some, the popularity of these games alone doesn’t make sense — and the idea of sitting down to watch someone else play on Twitch seems irrational.

But when you look under the hood of Twitch, you understand why some Google stock holders are excited about the deal.

Here’s why the billion-dollar buyout of Twitch.tv could be a boon for GOOG in the years ahead:

Twitch Deal Would Drive YouTube Content and Ads

Before you write off the Google acquisition, consider that Twitch.tv enjoys 45 million visitors per month and topped 1 million monthly broadcasters earlier in 2014.

That’s a whole lot of content for YouTube — and on top of that, a big potential revenue stream down the road as Twitch users have self-identified as avid gamers and are therefore a very attractive advertising segment.

Furthermore, as YouTube continues to explore the idea of paid channels for its service, Twitch.tv could provide synergy with exclusive gaming events and contests. Consider that last year, a video game tournament sold out the Staples Center in Los Angeles in just one hour, with thousands of fans clamoring for an opportunity to watch some of the best gamers in the world.

The popularity of video games and the potential of Twitch should be clear. But if you think this is all kids stuff and won’t move Google stock, think again.

Video game sales totaled more than $15 billion in 2013. That’s significantly higher than domestic box office sales just shy of $11 billion for the movie biz.

There clearly is a lot of dough in the lucrative arena of video games, which includes not just purchasing the games themselves, but also getting involved in other entertainment like Twitch.

Google clearly has a long way to go if it wants the Twitch.tv deal to hit the bottom line. And for the record, the deal is not tied up just yet, so until it is, Microsoft is in the running for this video game site that would complement its Xbox business.

But one way or another, you can be sure one of the big tech stocks will snap up Twitch.tv soon, and look to capitalize on the growing love of all things gaming.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP

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TWTR Stock – 5 Reasons Twitter Will NEVER Get It Right http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/twtr-stock-twitter/ http://slant.investorplace.com/2014/05/twtr-stock-twitter/#comments Mon, 19 May 2014 10:06:38 +0000 http://slant.investorplace.com/?p=15245 Twitter has struggled to turn a profit, is seeing slowing user growth and faces serious challenges with leadership both in the short-term and in the long run.

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Twitter (TWTR) is down about 50% year-to-date in 2014. It’s off about 57% from its all-time high in December after its post-IPO pop. And all told, TWTR stock is now hovering around all-time lows.

TWTR Stock 5 Reasons Twitter Will NEVER Get it RightThat’s right: Shares of Twitter stock are trading in the low $30s, and if this keeps up, TWTR could trade for at or below its offer price of $26 that marked its highly successful initial public offering in late 2013.

There are plenty of reasons to be negative about Twitter, but that hasn’t stopped some bargain hunters from nibbling at the stock after it has been beaten down.

I think that’s a very bad idea, and in fact, I see five big reasons TWTR might never get it right — in 2014, or perhaps ever:

Twitter Users Already Are Flatlining: In its recent earnings report, TWTR reported monthly active users totaled 255 million at the end of the quarter. Not only did that fall short of forecasts for 257 million, but it also shows a deceleration in Twitter’s growth rate. Sure, the growth was 25% year-over-year, but remember that in its Q4 numbers, Twitter reported 30% user growth. Even worse, consider that across 2011, Twitter was doubling its user base every single quarter. It’s starting to look like TWTR is rapidly approaching a ceiling on its user base — and for that to happen so soon after the IPO is very disturbing for investors who bought in based on continued brisk growth.

Twitter Is Struggling to Turn a Profit: Twitter still isn’t making money based on recent earnings. That’s not all that uncommon amid early-stage tech stocks. What’s more disturbing is that TWTR revenues and user growth are flattening out already. That means if Twitter doesn’t build a better mousetrap in a hurry to turn its users into a profit stream, the company will be feeling big pressure as its revenue growth dwindles and earnings fail to materialize.

Stock Awards Are Costly: Of course, management is getting compensated very nicely despite trouble for TWTR stock. In its official earnings release from April 29, Twitter said that of the $132 million shortfall for the first quarter under generally accepted accounting practices, “Twitter’s GAAP net loss included $126 million of stock-based compensation expense.” Furthermore: “Stock-based compensation expense is projected to be in the range of $640 million to $690 million” for the full year. That’s on total projected revenue of about $1.3 billion for the full year!

Twitter Not Run Tightly: In a recent Wall Street Journal profile, Twitter’s chief operating officer Ali Rowghani was pretty much described as the only adult at “a company filled with young engineers hungry to build a product.” There simply isn’t a culture there that looks at profits or Wall Street perceptions — which is fine when you’re a VC-funded startup, but murder if you’re a multibillion-dollar publicly traded stock like TWTR. The WSJ piece talks about how Rowghani had to dissuade CEO Richard Costolo from purchasing third-party app TweetDeck even when he was “uncertain about how TweetDeck would fit into the company” and worse, “changed his mind several times” on the topic. Yeesh!

No Margin for Error: It’s easy to pick on TWTR stock, but the sad reality for investors is that this company is not alone in its fight against shifting sentiment. LinkedIn (LNKD)has cratered 30% this year, and Facebook (FB) off more than 15% from its March peak. Beyond social and other high-flying Internet stocks from Yahoo (YHOO) to Amazon (AMZN) to Yelp (YELP) have all felt the pain. Broadly, there’s little margin of error for high-growth Internet and tech stocks … and when you post other metrics like the ones above, Wall Street is sure to be unforgiving.

Jeff Reeves is the editor of InvestorPlace.com and the author of The Frugal Investor’s Guide to Finding Great Stocks. Write him at editor@investorplace.com or follow him on Twitter via @JeffReevesIP. As of this writing, he did not own a position in any of the stocks named here.

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